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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,647 (some duplicates have been removed)
, 2003, the united states was pushing very hard to get iran referred to the u.s. security council for not being forthcoming. remember that there was the war in iraq. there was a strong push on the part of the europeans, especially britain, germany, and france not to go to the security council because they saw iran going the way of iraq. going to the security council would be a mandate for war. countries like france had been at odds with the united states over iraq and did not want to be at odds with the u.s. over iran, but wanted to stop the united states from doing what it did to iraq. we had a dramatic event where the foreign ministers of germany, in october, 2003, struck an agreement where iran would embark on uranium enrichment. it is the ultimate in dual use technology. it had the united states stepping back and britain, germany, and france became known as the eu3. in november of 2004, iran went along with this saying they would also be a part of uranium enrichment. but he doesn't buy, eu3 was submitting a proposal to iran promising help for its program. this is where you get
president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to win but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as opposed to 51. so a lot of the policymaking will be pushed into the budget and he'll just have to pick up one or two people on that. if you assume that he is going to do what he said he's going to do, i think a lot of his priorities will be enacted. and i think it will be bad on the budget side, as i said. includin
not accept what happened from some of the citizens of the united states who offended the prophet mohammed-- peace be upon him. there was also somebody who wanted to burn the koran and this is something we do not accept at all. so the demonstrations were an expression of a high level of anger and a rejection of what is happening and the u.s. embassy represents the symbol of america as a people and government so people, the demonstrators, had a loud voice and as a government, it's our responsibility as the government of egypt we protected the embassy. we do not condone any attack against any embassies or any guests. this is a part of our principles and culture and what our religion orders us to do. >> rose: so the united states government and egyptian government are friends, not enemies? >> ( translated ): we are not enemies, of course. >> rose: you're our friends? >> ( translated ): for sure we are friends. >> rose: allies? >> the u.s. president said otherwise. >> rose: i know he did. but i'm asking the egyptian president. do you consider the united states an ally? >> ( translated ): this
the united states government and egyptian government are friends, not enemies? >> ( translated ): we are not enemies, of course. >> rose: you're our friends? >> ( translated ): for sure we are friends. >> rose: allies? >> the u.s. president said otherwise. >> rose: i know he did. but i'm asking the egyptian president. do you consider the united states an ally? >> ( translated ): this is depending on the definition of an ally. we have a real partnership in the interest and we want to achieve the interest of the world and to participate in many issues-- diplomatic, political, economical-- exchange of expertise in several areas. so the understanding of an ally as a part of a military alliance this is not existing right now. but if you mean by ally, partner and special diplomatic relationship and cooperation we are that ally. >> rose: president morsi for the hour. next. >> tonight a special edition of charlie rose. >> rose: mohamed morsi won an historic election this june to become the fifth president of egypt. he is the first civilian to hold this title. two years ago it would have been
of 20% of iran's call for sanctions, the united states there is a problem that iran to want to negotiate for a position which has changed -- you talk about 20% -- they want sanctions to be lifted with them stopping 20%. the question is they are enriching. we said their right to enrich should be recognized and that would negate all the u.n. sanctions. the nuclear issue stems from u.n. security council issues. within the margins of this issue, there is room to change going forward. i think we may find that it is constrained by the fact that israel is still there. israel is not about to let go of its concerns. i think there has been a lack of dialogue. it would be good if the two sides could sit down together. they could start with this temple and hold discussions and feel of how each side can help each other. my advice for the u.s. diplomats would be to sit with them and say we are not going to talk about the nuclear issue, how is your family. there is the fact of just discussing. on the other side, there is the problem that it is not clear what the endgame is. we're calling on iran to sus
. >> this is not a case of protests directed at the united states at large or at united states policy but in response to a video that is offensive. >>chris: you do not believe that? >>guest: absolutely. in fact, it is the case. we have had the evolution of the arab spring the last many months. what sparked the violence was the airing on the internet of a hateful and offensive video that has offended many people around the world. our strong view is there is no excuse for violence, it is absolutely reprehensible and never justifyied. but there are those who have reacted with violence and the governments have increasingly responded and protected our facilities and condemned the violence. this outrageous response to what is an offensive video. in question that in the past with "satanic verses," and cartoon of the prophet mohammed, there have been protesters that have sparked. >>chris: critics say this outpouring of outrage against the united states has everything to do with the u.s. policies. that we are disengaging from that part of the world, we pulled out of iraq, we pulled out of afghanistan, and ira
them to bring it back into the united states that the condition that they invest in excellent capital in the united states. we tried to repatriation in 2004 and companies brought back the money and went out to shareholders and there is no actual investments in expansion of capital equipment, so i think having a compromise where you allow companies to repatriate the money coming out of the 35% tax rate, but maybe 10% to 12%, the tie that with actual metrics of expanding the workforce or investment in the united states is something we're looking at. secondly, i am president obama's proposal is a tax credit for companies to bring manufacturing back or invest back in the united states in communities and create jobs and proposed a 20% tax credit for those types of companies. why do you cut the corporate tax rate across the board? my argument for that is i don't think right now that either my law firm was investment bank of wall street needs that. i say let's target to areas that are in economic growth. so i am sympathetic to taxiing if they can be tied to accountability for companies to ac
. but the u.s. has declined. the united states has never proposed iran a comprehensive package. never. my point is this. first, try at least once. i real hi don't care in iran whether we have a conservative or moderate president or reformist because i have been working for 16 years under the presidents and i know we did our utmost to get a good -- to bring the relation, to improve the relation with the u.s. and the u.s. always declined. therefore, this is the same policy during ahmadinajed. but they have better justification during ahmadinajed. they use the holocaust and all the these rhetorics which is very harmful for iran's national interests. my suggestion is this. any u.s. administration i hope after the election -- because we cannot talk before the election -- propose at least once after 33 years a comprehensive package including terrorism, weapons of mass destruction, peace process, israel, human rights, democracy, all these major points for the u.s. and iranians also they have their own shopping list. and the u.s. also should be prepared to address iranian concerns. if it failed,
for the united states. hundreds of libyans amassed outside the consulate, airing signs denouncing yesterday's violent destruction which led to the death of u.s. ambassador christopher stevens and three others. in addition libyan authorities arrested four men suspected of instigating the protests. president obama called both egyptian president morsi and magariaf. the two calls had decidedly different tones. president obama expressed appreciation to libyan president magariaf for the cooperation received from the libyan government and people in responding to the attack. though questions still remain about the role libyan terrorists played in escalating the attacks. with respect to egypt the president had made an interesting comment in an interview earlier yesterday with telemundo. >> would you consider the current egyptian regime an ally of the united states? >> obama: i don't think that we would consider them an ally but we don't consider them an enemy. >> eliot: against this backdrop, president obama's phone call with egyptia
the murder thursday of four american diplomates. including united states ambassador chris stevens in benghazi, libya, in what officials believe was a terrorist attack designed to coincide with the anniversary of september 11th. and joining us dan henninger, mary anastasia o'grady and, with the anti-american protests across the arab world this week, tell us about our standing in that part of the world, and the ferment in arabia? >> well, i think, paul, what's happening here is where essentially we came in when the arab spring began in egy egypt, tunisia and spread to other countries and the feeling at that time that came out the united states couldn't really support any of these movements in the arab spring because quote unquote, we don't know who these people are, which is to say that the united states, and including the state department, just was not that engaged with these countries at that time. now, when you think of how, to what extent egypt or libya since these transitions have been in the news, it's been basically not at all on their own, and still a piece with the obama administration
about, this problem between israel and the united states over iran and what do we do about it? the prime minister is saying the united states ought to publicly draw a red line and tell iran you cannot go beyond this point in your nuclear weapons development. where do you see-- what do you see happening on this front? >> well, that's an approach i think that probably can't work, simply because the iranians may be doing things already that we don't know about. and i think it's legitimate to say, even if they don't cross the nuclear weapons threshold, if they get 90% of the way there, that's not a very comforting outcome. so let me suggest a different approach, bob. instead of red linees, let me suggest deadlines. what we ought to do is going to the iranians with a diplomatic offer and make clear what it is they have to stop doing-- all the enrichment material they have to get rid of, the international inspections they have to respect, and sanctions would be reduced and they would be out from under the risk of attack. if they don't meet the deadline, i think the united states, israel, and o
towards the united states and its citizens. >> schieffer: was this a long-planned attack, as far as you know. what do you know about that? >> the way this perpetrators acted, moved, and their choosing specific date for this so-called demonstration, i think we have no-- this leaves us with no doubt that this was preplanned, predetermined. >> schieffer: and you believe this was the work of al qaeda and you believe that it was led by foreigners. is that what you're telling us? >> it was plans definitely, was planned by forers, by people who entered the country a few months ago, and they were planning this criminal act since their arrival. >> schieffer: mr. president, is it safe for americans there now? >> the security situation is-- is difficult, not only for americans. even for libbians themselves. we don't know what are the real intentions. of these perpetrators. how they will react. but there is no specific particular concern, danger for americans or any other foreigners. but the situation is not easy to keep stability. yes >> mr. president, will it be safe for the f.b.i. investigators
of saudi intelligence, ambassador to the united states and other countries >> a throughou these 80 some years that we have had our kingdom, everybody keeps talking about an uncertain future for the kingdom and because of the sagacity of the people of saudi arabia and the good will of the leadership and the government we have survived pretty well so far we have many problems to face, including syria. many challenges internal among the ung pele and how the go about the courses of development not just economically but socially and politically and the role of women, etc. all of these are tremendous challenges that are being debated within the kingdom and not coming from the outside. >> rose: tom friedman and prince turki al-faisal when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tom friedman is here, he is a pulitzer prize winning columnist in for the "new york times." for more than 30 years he's been writing ant foreign affairs, american politics and so much more. in addition to serving as bureau chief in beirut
managerial job in the world, president of the united states, leader of the free world. my question was how does he do it? how does he decide? how does he make decisions? how does he govern? not the context of the decisions, that's interesting, too, but what is the leadership style? i looked around for books a serious sustained way. >> host: do you see this as a campaign document coming out very close to the elections? >> guest: they do like to time things when people are paying attention and most americans tune in to politics around election time. >> host: each one of the things the with surprise to readers use it twice in the book those democrats this is a very critical study of the obama leadership all of the sources were democrat. tell us about that decision. >> guest: some of the politics longtime technical people in the defense department or the intelligence services and so on but for the most part these are people that worked alongside the president in one capacity or another in the white house and we need federal agencies in the house of congress to see him up close. what i discover
in the united states and said to be insulting to islam. >>> u.s. drones join the manhunt for those who killed a u.s. diplomat and three other americans. concerns over the tep id response by the new regime in egypt. >> i don't think that we would consider them an ally, but we don't consider them an enemy. >> we're covering every angle of this developing story. first, let's take a step back and look at how things have unfolded over the past 48 hours. the outrage first ignited tuesday in egypt. protesters converged on the embassy. within hours, crowds gathered outside benghazi, libya. armed militants killed the u.s. ambassador and three of the staffers. today, crowds storm the u.s. embassy in yemen. riot police eventually turned them back with tear gas. also today, demonstrators turn out in iran. they aamass outside the swiss embassy, which represents u.s. interests in iran. let's get the latest now from that region. mohammed jamjoon join us. >> about 2,000 to 3,000 protesters that were marching toward the u.s. embassy, many of them aable to get close enough to the main gates. they started scali
of the united states and i think he really did make it worse by sitting down with "the view." i love "the view," i love the show, they're all friends. i'm a big fan. but in was not the moment to sit down with "the view." that's done by mitt romney, by barack obama, by everyone else. but not this day and at this time. >> jamie rubin, there is a schedule. obviously that the campaign feels it wants to keep. they have a lot of events coming up just today. joe scarborough said this morning so meet with folks for 15 minutes. to something. what would you say about this? >> well, i come from the foreign policy side of the house and worked at the state department and the president's schedule would come up in meetings with the white house. and there's always this tension between the election calculations, the political calculations, and those in the foreign policy professionals. you know, from the standpoint of a professional, obviously you'd like to see the president engage with these crucial countries, not just our friend israel, but a lot of friends that we have in the world or as andrea put it, coun
a united states ambassador. he has been briefed on this matter and this could change a lot of things. it happened less than a year after people helped olivia took out moammar qaddafi. a mob of militants last night possibly members of an al qaeda group possibly stormed the building firing gunited states e firing guns and rocket propelled grenades. they climbed a wall of the compound appeared to meet very little resistance. in the early going one or two would run in and out then they got this flag. not a lot of damage done there. not alove the enormous cameras and this scene for the cameras. they burned and replaced it with a black islamic flag. the attackers in ghazi killed four americans. among them the ambassador chris stevens he was trying to escape at the time we are told. we are learning more about what may be motive. according to a member of the senate intelligence committee bill nelson say it could be attached to the killing of a top al qaeda leader. it may be because of an anti islamic movie that ridiculed mohammed. the initial reporting is one thing now we are getting into a
hit. topping the news today the united states ambassador to libya is dead along with three other americans after a violent attack on a consulate in that country. there are enormous questions who is responsible waudz it a planned terror attack? after wall it was on 9-11. who brings rocket propelled grenades to a demonstration. we will get into all of the new breaking details and very serious concerns in america and around the world. at the same time the president perhaps looking into the israeli government over differences of opinion in iran. the big and complicated picture coming up. it's all ahead as breaking news has changed everything on studio b. >> first from fox at 3:00 the deadly attack on the consulates in libya yesterday on 9-11 was a well planned commando style raid. coming to us from the chairman of the house committee commenting on the assault that killed a united states ambassador. he has been briefed on this matter and this could change a lot of things. it happened less than a year after people helped olivia took out moammar qaddafi. a mob of militants last night po
that the united states had nothing to do with the youtube video that seems to have sparked the violent protests. >> this video is disgusting and reprehensible. it appears to have a deeply cynical purpose, to denigrate a great religion and to provoke rage. but as i said yesterday, there is no justification, none at all, for responding to this video with violence. we condemn the violence that has resulted in the strongest terms. >> egypt is where the latest violence against the u.s. started. egypt may be where the u.s. faces its biggest challenges. you've got angry crowds protesting for a third day over a film that insults islam. now, demonstrates threw mocks and molotov cocktails, pushed through the barbed wire fencing outside the embassy in cairo. police responded by firing tear gas. ian lee is join ugs from the egyptian capital. ian, this is three days with these kind of demonstrations. first of all, do we expect that on friday, a day of prayer, it's going to be much, much bigger and more violent? >> reporter: well, it's definitely going to be a lot bigger. the muslim brotherhood is calling fo
of days ago, president obama said egypt was not exactly the united states' ally, but it wasn't its enemy either. did those words have anything to do with this? >> reporter: i think there is a certain amount of alarm among the leadership of the muslim brotherhood. those i've spoken with did seem to get the message, that the united states was unhappy with the response or the reaction of mohammed morsi, the egyptian president, to the breaching of the american embassy. they felt that maybe it's time to start sending out a more reassuring messages to the united states. but what's significant is that on the one hand the message is come i coming out in english to a nonarabic audience, seemed to be pointing in the direction of reconciliation. i was at a demonstration this morning at a mosque not in the tahrir square area where it was organized by the muslim brotherhood. and the chants were not reassuring. one of the chants was "obama there are a million osamas." referring, of course, to osama bin laden, be chanting that united states is the enemy of god. it appears that the muslim brotherhood is
it because he loved the work. he really thought the mission of the united states to help these fragile countries move ahead, start anew, that's what he really loved about libya. from the time that he was working to restore ties with the libyan government to being an envoy to the opposition and helping the rebels on the ground in bengzi, to now becoming the u.s. ambassador to libya, he really was someone that felt it was really important to kind of -- the democratic values and need to build proper institutions and try and have a peaceful stable country. >> we understand that he was really regarded in some ways as a hero to the rebels and the people in benghazi in particular. how did he feel? how comfortable did he feel moving around in libya? >> he felt very comfortable. that's what a lot of people are talking about today that maybe he felt a little too comfortable. chris was someone that felt very at ease in benghazi. he knew the area well. he knew the country well. so he might have not -- he might have felt a little bit more immune than some other people would to his safety because he
is governed by the 1854 treaty between the chip with a nation and the united states -- chipewa nation and the united states government. it guaranteed that tribal nations can continue to fish, hunt and gather and otherwise use the land to support their way of life. however, in its current form this bill completely ignores the treaty rights of tribal nations. the minnesota process is moving forward in the state of minnesota includes the tribal nations. we need to make sure that the fond du lac band of lake superior chippewa, the grand portage band of lake chippewa, have their treaty obligations protected and met by the united states government. the tribal council of grand portage of chippewa has contacted my office to express their great opposition to this bill. the chairwoman of the fond du lac band of chippewa has sent letters in opposition to the governor, the secretary of agriculture, and to senators and representatives. at the appropriate time i have a copy of that letter to submit to the record. the chair: request the will be covered by general leave. ms. mccollum: thank you. minn
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,647 (some duplicates have been removed)

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